Tuesday, July 22, 2008

PAS & DAP vs UMNO & PKR? Bizarre yet best!

OK, sodomy is off the front page whilst ‘Malay unity’ in Selangor (and perhaps Perak too), purportedly to keep the Chinese dominated DAP out of State governments, is on!

As Malaysiakini shows us in its news article Umno 'opportunists' causing friction in PAS, racially oriented politics would be the only news that could kick sodomy on its arse out (excuse the deliberate pun)

But of course, a combination of the two, salacious sleazy sexual misdemeanour involving racist politicians would certainly be top news ;-)

Mazlan Aliman, PAS Johor information chief said UMNO opportunists were attempting to sow discord among PAS leaders by deliberately revealing the two Malay-dominated parties had covert meetings to forge a power-sharing arrangement when there actually wasn’t any such pact – you know, the old (orang putih) colonial strategy of ‘divide and rule’.

Hmmm, I reckon Mazlan was mouthing the views of PAS spiritual leader Pak Haji Nik Aziz, because I would imagine PAS president, Pak Haji Hadi Awang possibly having a different opinion. That’s where the potential PAS schism may be.

Mazlan said: "I support the call by PAS spiritual leader Nik Abdul Aziz Nik Mat for all PAS leaders to unite and avoid being divided by the machinations of opportunists. Umno must put its own house in order before meddling in PAS' affairs."

Of course now that PAS has revealed the UMNO lack of success in seducing PAS over to its side, Khir Toyo, being one always to see a half glass as half full, decided to rubbish Anwar Ibrahim as a consolation prize.

We are told by Malaysiakini article Umno-PAS rule in S'gor - 'Anwar ruined it' that Khir accused Anwar Ibrahim of ‘Malay disunity’, by influencing PAS not to cooperate with UMNO in forming a joint government in Selangor after the 08 March elections.

Khir had deliberately ignored the truth that it was PAS spiritual leader, Pak Haji Nik Aziz, who has virtually fatwa-ed PAS not to have any form of cooperation with the UMNO snake.


So Khir exploited the PAS rejection of a wooing UMNO to lay it on thick against Anwar, saying the PKR de facto leader was not supportive of 'Malay unity', as evidenced by the backing he enjoys from the 'extremist' Chinese party DAP and the Hindu Rights Action Force (Hindraf).

He stated: "Unfortunately the influence of Anwar in PAS through the party's secretary-general Kamaruddin Jaafar blocked the initiative."


"As long as Anwar is important in Pakatan Rakyat, the muzakarah will not succeed. Anwar does not want to see Malays unite and that is why he formed Pakatan that thrives on the ideals of equality to the extent of elevating other religions on the same par as the primary religion in this country, Islam."

Obviously Khir wanted to destroy Anwar’s image in the eyes of the faithful in the heartland.

But Pak Haji Nik Aziz is not one to believe in UMNO’s offer of ‘Malay unity’, for he (most astutely) reckoned that any government formed through the proposed Pan-Malay coalition would only be for the interest of UMNO rather than Malay interests.

Now, this is something that PKR’s Mohamad Fairus Khairudin (Penang’s Deputy CM) should know, if not would know, but alas, he still had begged UMNO to invite PKR's Malay leaders besides those from PAS.

Given Mohamad Fairus Khairudin’s proclivity for an ethno-centric political alliance, I wonder whether PKR can continue to be a reliable member of the Pakatan Rakyat, as a PAS (under Pak Haji Nik Aziz) has surprisingly proven to be.

I dare not dream, yet must, of two ideologically puritanial, earnest and honest parties forming a 'clean' coalition, yes, the yin and yang of Malaysian politics, for a non-corruptible, transparent and totally accountable Malaysian government in the future.

Amin.

24 comments:

  1. The Deputy Chief Minister of Penang was alleged to use Government money to visit London for private holidays but guise as commercial visit. He took along many number of Angkatan Muda members and the Chief Minister was not aware of the visit.

    So this is PKR clean and transference government.

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  2. Its better to work with Anwar than having Umno with no balls MCA and aiyohyoh MIC,siphoning away the country's wealth.At least Anwar worked towards a united Malaysia and fairness to all, watch my mouth, fairness to all and not some privileged Umno greasy cronies , MCA's Ah Longs and pot bellied towkays and MIC's gangs.
    How can the corrupted Toyo talks about a united Malay when he has siphon so much money from the Selangor Govt? If he has the balls, swear by the Quran or with the ulamas. I am sure there will be many SDs coming in about how much each one pay him in cash for the recent election. The pot should not called the kettle black. We all know how corrupted he is, a look at the Botox face tells all.

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  3. This son of a bitch Toyo, has the balls to talk of Malay unity after UMNO sodomized PAS before. Malay unity for what? To further enrich themselves, with their ill- gotten wealth. After 51 years of Independence, if he has any sense of responsibility he should be concentrating of Malaysian Unity. Sad. Good thing the voters have better sense to get rid of a blooming snake like him.

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  4. Ktemoc,
    Stop writting nonsense!

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  5. PAS members and UMNO members are both Muslims. Therefore, logically, they should be able to get along well with each other.

    So, it's quite puzzling that they should view each other as adversaries. There seems to be this schism between the parties whereby at one stage accusations of kafir (infidels) being hurled by one side at the other.

    Is it true that PAS follows the Shiite branch of Islam whereas UMNO follows the Sunni branch?

    Can you, KT, or other knowledgeable readers throw some light on this?

    Bewildered Observer

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  6. anal prostitute1:07 am, July 23, 2008

    people-why can't he write rubbish? all he writes is rubbish anyway. do u like anal? call me. my no is with rubbish writer..

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  7. Let UMNO fade and put Anwar's PKR aside, PAS and DAP marriage will be a dream couple for the future, both are clean, dicipline and transparent.
    The "caliph" Guan Eng and Pak Haji Nik Aziz would agree, provided Karpal Singh has become a history.

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  8. What inconsistency from within PAS. Pondering over too the report that one of the meetings (maybe the first one) took place on 10th of March. so TWO days after the Pakatan's landslide victory, PAS plotted with "the enemy" to drive out their colleague in the Pakatan. Integrity? Shame that they claim to represent the voice of Islam in this country.

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  9. kettle calling the pot8:59 am, July 23, 2008

    On July 22, 2008 11:58 PM, 'People' said...

    "Ktemoc,
    Stop writting nonsense!"

    I quite agree. On the other hand, I also somewhat agree with the "anal prostitute" who asked on July 23, 2008 1:07 AM,

    "people-why can't he write rubbish? all he writes is rubbish anyway."

    I am not sure if all KTemoc writes is rubbish: he used to be quite ok. It is his more recent posts that have descended to that level. For example, in the present post, this detente between DAP and PAS on the one side and PKR and UMNO on the other, is of course rubbish, and the kind of political configuration that he works out won't happen -- well not in the general sense. It's just wishful thinking propelled by his hatred of DSAI.

    I still read KTemoc though, in spite of his nonsensical commentary, because
    o he is funny
    o I hope that he'll improve

    Anyway, I am not against the scatology found in the comments. Didn't KTemoc encourage it by using the language that some of his commentators try to imaginatively reciprocate?? His obsession with the anus is metaphor-ridden and the commentators merely wanted to be in step with him here. Didn't he say in the present post, "sodomy is off the front page," then says later about "news that could kick sodomy on its arse"?? Couldn't the commentators then use the same figurative scatalogical language as a reaction to language like this??

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  10. The talks between UMNO and PAS in the immediate aftermath of BN
    s defeat in Selangor were real.

    You did mention, but completely ignored the signficance of one throwaway line...".....the influence of Anwar in PAS ......blocked the initiative."

    So it was Anwar which torpedoed the attempt at forming an unholy UMNO-PAS alliance.

    Fairus Khairudin's suggestion was more ironical than anything else, try to understand Malay politics a bit deeper before you try to be a commentator on it.

    Is DAP having talks with Gerakan to merge with Gerakan ? Just trying to be Kuai Lan...

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  11. No kittykat, I did not ignore it. I believe it was an exploitative attempt by Khir Toyo to badmouth Anwar in the eyes of the 'heartland'.

    Besides, PAS is not easily influenced by Anwar. It was the known fact of UMNO being anathema to Nik Aziz that prevented the proposed Pan-Malay pact.

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  12. I'm spreading the below article from The Edge Daily which I find most revealing. Simple and makes sense. Please read and let's all return back to using our minds (instead of just "Saya sokong", "Saya sokong", justice and righteousness.

    Separate politics from economic management
    By R B Bhattacharjee

    Recent events involving leaders on both sides of the political divide are uncanny enough to stop people in their tracks. The first-ever US presidential-style debate between Pakatan Rakyat (PR) leader Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim and Information Minister Datuk Shabery Cheek last Wednesday, that had the startling PR theme “If we form the government today, we'll reduce the oil price tomorrow”, suggests an impatience on the opposition coalition's part to take over the helm of the nation. The signal that change may be in the air is surely not lost on the business community too.

    The next day, further confirmation that all is not well in the political sphere came when Anwar was arrested by police in response to a sodomy report lodged by a former party volunteer. More precisely, the SWAT-style interception of Anwar's car by balaclava-clad police personnel in a convoy is not exactly the usual reaction to a sexual offence report. The strenuous explanations of the Home Minister and a senior police official, and the ruckus in Parliament over the arrest, all make the political point too obvious.

    These developments, and many lesser tremors over the past several weeks, have generated a cloud of uncertainty over the political landscape. The message it bears for business is “wait and see”.

    Naturally, therefore, Malaysia has been pushed to the side of investors' radar screens, together with Thailand, which is in the midst of political churn as well.

    One weakness in the current governance environment in Malaysia is the overly powerful effect of political developments on the conduct of economic affairs. This is to be expected due to the unbroken hold that the same political parties have had over the federal government since Independence five decades ago. Now, however, the time has come for the administration to be separated from the economic management of the country. This is a journey towards good governance that we have to take. There are lessons in this regard that can be drawn from the experience of our neighbours.

    During the 21 years of Ferdinand Marcos' rule over the Philippines, more schools, hospitals and infrastructure were built than in the tenure of the nine presidents who preceded him. Much of this was accomplished through hundreds of millions of dollars in aid from the US, which Marcos and his cronies unabashedly tapped for personal gain. The extent of the kleptocracy was so huge that till today no one is able to accurately estimate how many billions have been salted away.

    The excesses of the Marcos regime finally led to his overthrow in the spectacular People's Power uprising of 1986. Ironically, after the dictator was deposed, the political situation became highly fractious. Not surprisingly, some became nostalgic for the orderly if heavy-handed government of his era, when the citizenry was law-abiding and disciplined.

    Since the March 8 general election, Malaysia has entered a new phase of democracy that is tending to become rather turbulent. While there is a vast difference between the Philippines, which Marcos had to flee, and the political climate in Malaysia today, it is clear that the Barisan Nasional (BN) government is being challenged in unprecedented ways. The contest for the people's support between the BN and the nascent PR has led to exposés involving land deals to charges of questionable use of representatives' allocations and even an attempt to file a no-confidence motion against the prime minister and his government.

    Clearly, this is a time for some honest reckoning to take place.
    When economic mismanagement left the Filipinos with empty rice pots, they began to look overseas for jobs and incomes that their government had failed to provide. The well-educated and urbane Filipina domestic maids who are a familiar feature in many Malaysian households are testimony to this failure of development to meet the people's basic right to a livelihood.

    The Philippines is also the largest supplier of maritime crew in the world, partly because a Filipino seaman can earn up to 500 times his local wages if he manages to get out of his country. So powerful is this incentive that impoverished rural youth go to great lengths to secure a certificate from the many maritime training centres in the Philippines.

    However, shipping lines that employ these “instant” crew have found that their skills are extremely suspect, resulting in a high rate of accidents and indiscipline among them. Indeed, the credentials are so dodgy that international liners have set up maritime institutes of their own in the Philippines to ensure that their graduates measure up to the required standards.

    Malaysia appears to be a long way from such a situation, but if its people are not to land in the same boat one day, governance authorities in both the public and private sectors need to uphold a strict code of accountability.

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  13. Mate, the only way to stop Anwar is for DAP to become a one-stop-political-shop for all progressive Malaysians. That means a Malay support based must be developed.

    An alliance - even a tentative one - directly between DAP and PAS will be very short lived at best, for obvious ideological reasons. It's charming to imagine disparate elements coming together for the sake of facing a grave common threat, but that only works with a threat on the scale of imminent war or something like that.

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  14. Aiyoyo Ktemoc,
    If you have actually spoken to earnest PAS grassroots supporters who quote from the Koran every 30 seconds, you would realise an attempted Alliance PURELY consisting of PAS and "Islamic State over my dead body" DAP would last, like 1 week.

    For the moment, what you consider the smelly PKR, with its messy, compromised mixture of majority secular-minded UMNO-lookalike Malays and plenty of Chinese/Indians/Kadazans is the bridge holding together an alternative to BN.

    Unless, of course, BN is really your preference all along....kakakakak..

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  15. KT,

    The religious tok iman types in PAS will never, never, ever leave/disband PAS.
    The socialist singkek types in DAP will never,never,ever leave/disband DAP.
    Thus, your "dream" PAS-DAP merger is already in existance i.e. in the name of PKR, unless you choose to be distracted by founding team's political history, personal issues, etc.

    U got that ? Oh well, why do I even bother arguing with a 21-year old uni student in Perth/Brisbane/Melbourne, wherever. Now, go finish your term paper, KT.

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  16. kittykat ;-) I have always been upfront with my suspicion about your de facto leader - that he's using PKR only as a stepping stone BACK into UMNO - which is why I cannot place any hope in PKR as long as he & core company are in the party.

    I have great respect for people like Eli Wong and a few genuine people (maybe my blogging matey Susan is still a member; she was!) but those Anwar's core members, former UMNO apparatchiks like Azmin Ali & company, are what RPK said of them, fanatical anwaristas who will go back to UMNO when/if Anwar succeeds in prying his way back in.

    I am aware that PAS and DAP are seas apart but at least these two are far more sincere and committed than the inner core group of PKR. I admit it's just a dream but who knows ........

    But to trust Anwar? Forget about that lah! He's UMNO through & through, as evidenced by his hypocritical reformasi!

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  17. 1st of all, m i the only want who notices the irony here?? AI has been trying to seduce BN reps to jump ship (while us, the ‘bloggerhood’, cheer him on), but now that 1 of his own camp is thinking of jumping ship, WE/PR SHOULD B UPSET??

    hey, it’s FAIR GAME the moment AI started it. this is only a taste of his own medicine.

    we now know that PR is not united enough to b the alternative government we so craved. i hate to say “i told u so.”

    Election 2008 - Vote for PUNDAK
    http://juslo.blogspot.com/2008/03/election-2008-vote-for-pundak.html

    i think it’s more complicated that what u’ve stated above, though i agree with much of it.

    i think it’s both bcos PAS is being ‘manja’ with their PR partners, as well as realizing — like so many of us do — that PR would not last long.

    i suspect AI realizes as much — i read his aggressive push for “democratic coup d’etat” as a way of holding the PR together, dangling before every 1 of them the prospect of forming the next government, in order to prevent PR’s elected reps from jumping — not so much to try to win over the BN frogs.

    come on, just look at the numbers: it takes 30 frogs for PR to come into power BUT IT ONLY TAKES E-I-G-H-T PR frogs for BN to keep its 2/3 majority. WHO IS MORE VULNERABLE??? especially when many of the Keadilan reps r just OPPORTUNISTS — n i think if Sept 16 doesnt happen, many of them will start jumping.

    back to PAS — look, its chief political goal is to establish an islamic state. yes, i agree that it has done a lot to win over the non-muslims in this past election but IT LEADS TO NOWHERE, as far as its ultimate political goal is concerned.

    assuming it can win over ALL non-muslims, it STILL CANNOT establish an islamic state!! it’s like passing all your remaining tests but still come 2nd/ not the winner - WHAT’S THE POINT?? with DAP on the same boat, the boat’ll NEVER b allowed to head towards Mecca!!

    so, PAS leaders will constantly wake up from their ’sweet’ dreams n start asking, “true, i’ve lived my SWEET dreams in real life by winning many non-muslims over, but when m i going to realize my WET DREAM (of chopping adulterors’ heads off n wrapping every lady in burqa)??”

    then they’ll ask, how best to realize that WET DREAM??
    working with godless infidels CAN NEVER b the answer — in fact, it’s STRAYING FURTHER N FURTHER down the wrong path!! (the muslim brohterhood would tell them that, i bet.)

    then, a desparate UMNO comes along… who is desperate to hang on to power n dont mind giving PAS the FORMS (as opposed to SUBSTANCE) it seeks - burqas n hudud on the books. u r happy, i m happy, that’s most important, right??

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  18. kettle calling the pot3:00 pm, July 23, 2008

    Yes, I agree with int, kittykat and an anonymous commentator above. The only way to stop Anwar (if the fantasies of the Anwar-phobic KTemoc are to be realised) is for the DAP to develop a strong Malay support base. This is not impossible, considering what has become of DAP's mother party in Singapore, which appeared to get surprisingly good support from the Malays in the two previous general elections there. Of course, the circumstances on the Malaysian mainland are different, and the best option for now, for anyone who upholds the DAP's socialist ideals, is for it to join forces with Anwar and the PKR.

    Int: you are too kind in describing KTemoc's belief in a DAP and PAS alliance as 'charming'. I view it as ridiculous. The only way for the two parties to have an alliance is for Anwar and the PKR to stand in the middle, which is pretty much what is happening now. This is the realpolitik that both Lim Kit Siang and Hadi Awang understand, but which an Aussie-based fantasist like KTemoc doesn't.

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  19. cut from the team3:10 pm, July 23, 2008

    ahaaaa...another ranting over the muzhakarah thing.

    the muzhakarah is no big thing la.do you expect that PAS and UMNO gonna have a pact again after their last collabo in the 70's?.no way.i dont they will be "friends" with UMNO.no worry there.

    about muzharah,if it's for good then why not just go on.i dont see anything wrong there if both from PAS and UMNO adamant on their faith for each own political ideology.just accept it as just talks between two different political parties and if there are any resolutions after the discussion then hopefully the resolution is for the betterment of the rakyat.

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  20. "...Aussie-based fantasist like KTemoc doesn't."

    haiyah, can we drop the "Aussie-based" please :P I am also Ausie-based at the moment. I believe Farish Noor is also based overseas.

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  21. Right now, we have some PAS people tempted to betray the Pakatan and walk into the trap of "power sharing" with UMNO. But KTemoc... as usual... decides to train his guns on KeADILan and Anwar instead.

    Take any issue, and KT will undoubtedly find a way to blame Anwar for it, even if it means going waaaay off tangent.

    Anwar must have done something during his UMNO years in the 80s/early 90s that really pissed off KT.

    It could also be that the KeADILan has done what KTemoc's DAP couldn't. While both parties have roughly similar socio-democratic agenda's, KeADILan has managed to attract a Malay base in addition to support from the non's. Must really piss him off to see Dr.Tan join KeADILan instead. Either way, its a gain for the Pakatan...

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  22. Dear All

    I'm convinced that the most viable option to the right-of-centre BN is a left-of-centre equivalent.

    This would be the current Pakatan Rakyat consisting of PKR, DAP, PAS, PSM. DAP has a strong Chinese base, the PAS has the religious Malays, PKR has the more secular Malays, PSM has the radical leftists. PKR and DAP are the more pragmatic political parties while the PAS and the PSM are the more ideological parties.
    PAS and PSM, being ideological parties, are less susceptible to corruption and political compromise. PAS and PSM can act like the "conscience" of the Pakatan Rakyat and its internal watchdogs. Where do the Indians go?
    If not the PKR or DAP, then they should have their own progressive political party within the PR.


    It's easy to talk about a multiracial political party but in actuality, a coalition of ethnic-based political parties is more viable. Most people tend to think along ethnic or religious lines.

    We need to keep supporting the PR.
    It's the only viable alternative to the BN.

    Phua Kai Lit

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  23. "Must really piss him off to see Dr.Tan join KeADILan instead."

    Last year, it was DAP that was making high profile recruitments while PKR was bleeding as some of it's high profile members left. Right now, PKR is riding high because of the unexpectedly large electoral gains, and the promise (threat?) of forming the backbone of the next Federal government. Let's see what happens over the long term...

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  24. even by just looking at the picture, brought tears to my eyes. Is this the people of the so-called next PM. More likely the goons of the next PIRATE in Malaysia.
    Goons with no brains to spare!

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